We're sure you don't like jargon - and neither do we. But it's a fact of real estate life. This glossary is here to help you make sense of it. And we've put a special emphasis on terms that reflect today's housing market.

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"n" Terms

Nails in load-bearing parts of new homes that pop out slightly because of settling of the structure.
A seller's asking price that is based on factors such as the required funds to pay off the mortgage, the cost of remodeling or the purchase of another house.
The situation occurs when a borrower's monthly payment is not large enough to cover both the principal and interest of a loan. As a result, the outstanding balance of the loan actually grows larger with each payment rather than smaller. Most fixed-rate loans are not subject to negative amortization, but many adjustable-rate mortgages are susceptible.
A driveway that drops from street level to the garage.
Planning of a community that favors the return of new-home development with such traditional features as grid-street patterns, prominent front porches, backyard garages, multi-use buildings and housing clustered near commercial service areas.
Investment property that generates income after expenses such as principal, interest, taxes and insurance are subtracted.
The worth of a person or company based on the difference between total assets and liabilities.
A community design philosophy that favors the return of new-home development with such traditional features as prominent front porches, backyard garages, multi-use buildings and housing clustered near commercial service areas.
The response sometimes given by neighborhoods and communities to proposed changes or development.
The amount of the new mortgage covers the remaining balance of the first loan, closing costs, any liens and cash no more than 1 percent of the principal on the new loan.
A lot in which the buyer's home will be constructed by a particular builder.
A loan application that does not require verification of income but typically is granted in cases of large down payments.
A loan provision that prohibits the transfer of a mortgage to another borrower without lender approval.
An asset such as a house that is not easily turned into cash.
Costs that are one-time only fees for such items as an appraisal, loan points, credit report, title insurance and a home inspection.
The legal document that requires a borrower to repay a mortgage at a certain interest rate over a specified period of time.
The interest rate specified in a mortgage note.
A lender's initial action when a mortgage payment is late and attempts to reconcile the ssue out of court have failed.
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